The Brydons

Scotland to Canada

Brydon - Armstrong family

Brydon - Armstrong family

Starts with Adam Brydon and Margaret Armstrong in Dumfriesshire, Scotland in the 1770's. Their son, David marries Janet Glendenning and settles in Waterloo County, Ontario.

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1
'Having just played tennis'
"Having just played tennis"
Berta Brydon in South Africa
 
 
2
Archie Brydon
Archie Brydon
A contractor, built houses and bridges in Ontario. 
 
3
James Brydon
James Brydon

Gravenhurst 
 
4
Bertie Brydon
Bertie Brydon
At nursing school 
 
5
railway permit
railway permit
for travel to and from South Africa 
 
6
Berta Brydon
Berta Brydon
in South Africa 
 
7
Berta Brydon with her students
Berta Brydon with her students
 
 
8
Berta Brydon
Berta Brydon
Took over the operation of a worldwide group of companies after the death of husband. 
 
9
Builds Bonnie Babies
Builds Bonnie Babies
Glaxo a product sold by Harold Ritchie, husband of Alice Alberta Brydon.
Some of his other products were Tanglefoot fly paper, Glover's Mange Cure and Fralinger's Salt Water Taffy. 
 
10
letter from Alice to her aunt
letter from Alice to her aunt
from South Africa, 1902 
 
11
Alice Alberta at nursing school
Alice Alberta at nursing school
Bertie Brydon 
 
12
Brewster house
Brewster house
built by Archie Brydon 
 
13
Winfield Brewster
Winfield Brewster
 
 
14
Scarborough Settler's Lament
Scarborough Settler's Lament
written in 1840 by Sandy Glendenning who called it ‘Awa wi Scarboro’s Muddy Creeks’. Sandy was the brother-in-law of David Brydon. David and his wife Janet Glendenning stayed with Sandy in Scarborough when they first arrived in Ontario.

The poem was turned into a song by Canadian folk-singer Stan Rogers and became a standard for Canadian singers.

Here it is performed by Jesse Ferguson, aka The Bard of Cornwall.

Away with Canada's muddy creeks
And Canada's fields of pine
Your land of wheat is a goodly land,
But oh, it is not mine
The heathy hill, the grassy dale.
The daisy spangled lea,
The purling burn and craggy linn --
Auld Scotia's land give me.

Oh, I would like to hear again
The lark on Tinny's hill
And see the wee bit gowany
That blooms beside the rill.
Like banished Swiss who views afar
His Alps with longing e'e.
I gaze upon the morning star
That shines on my country.

No more I'll win by Eskdale Pen
Or Pentland's craggy comb.
The days can ne'er come back again
Of thirty years that's gone,
But fancy oft at midnight hour
Will steal across the sea.
Yestre'en amidst a pleasant dream
I saw my own country.

Each scene that met my view
Brought childhood's joys to mind.
The blackbird sang on Tushey linn
The song he sang lang syne.
But like a dream time flies away
And then the morning came.
And I awoke in Canada,
Three thousand miles from hame.

Sandy Glendinning, 1840 
 
15
James Brydon
James Brydon
 
 
16
Adie o' Aberlosk
Adie o' Aberlosk
Adam Brydon 
 
17
William Bryden of Aberlosk
William Bryden of Aberlosk
from "Prize Essays and Transactions of the Highland Society of Scotland Vol3" 
 
18
William Bryden of Aberlosk, pt2
William Bryden of Aberlosk, pt2
from "Prize Essays and Transactions of the Highland Society of Scotland" 
 
19
William Bryden of Aberlosk, pt3
William Bryden of Aberlosk, pt3
from "Prize Essays and Transactions of the Highland Society of Scotland"  
 
20
'Another very singular man'
"Another very singular man"
William Bryden of Aberlosk, Dumfriesshire, Scotland 
 
21
Yair, Selkirkshire
Yair, Selkirkshire
photo by Iain Lees 
 


Linked to Adam Bryden, Alice Alberta Brydon, Archibald Brydon, David Brydon, James Brydon